Corine Landcover mapping

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What does this data show me?

Corine data shows land cover types for Ireland as interpreted from satellite images. It uses 44 standard land cover types across Europe so that Corine Landcover data for all European Member States can be compared across Europe.

Land cover is different to land use: land cover means what is physically covering the land (such as forests, bogs, water, manmade surfaces) and land use refers to the function of the land (what it is being used for).

For more information please see Corine Landcover Mapping.

What is the data quality and/or fitness for use?

Corine is a land cover map, and land cover is not always equal to land use so it is not appropriate to use Corine as a land use map. As Corine is a pan European dataset the 25ha units of mapping are quite coarse and so may not be applicable to all purposes.

For more quality information please see Uses and Limitations of CLC data.

How up to date is it?

There have been 3 releases of Corine to date: 1990, 2000 and 2006. Each time a Corine update is created a “changes” file is also generated to show the areas that have changed land cover between the update cycles. A 2012 Corine dataset is being prepared by the EPA and will be released later on in 2014.

Where can I get this data?

You can view the data using our WebGIS on the Map link, under the Land group.

You can download the data from the EPA Database option of the Get data page. Documents about Corine are available under the Common data – Corine documents option. Shapefiles and legends can be downloaded under the Corine Landcover option. Shapefiles are presented county by county for quick download but we can send a national file to you if you request this using the Contact Us link.

An update of this data is expected late in 2014.

Soils and subsoils

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Irish Soil Information System (NEW)

What does this data show me?

The new Irish Soil Information System (SIS) soil maps was created by Teagasc in 2014, supported by the EPA (STRIVE Research Programme 2007-2013) and Teasgasc, to develop a new 1:250,000 scale national soil map of Ireland (http://http://gis.teagasc.ie/soils/). This updated National Soil Map of Ireland is compatible with existing soil survey coverage in other Member States of the European Union.

The Irish Soil Information System project utilised existing data and maps from the previous National Soil Survey (NSS) conducted by An Foras Taluntais (forerunner organisation to Teagasc), together with more recent map products, such as the Indicative Soil and Subsoil mapping with national coverage using GIS and remote sensing techniques. Using a combined methodology of novel predicted mapping techniques in tandem with traditional soil survey applications at the national scale has resulted in the development of a new national soil map of Ireland.

What is the data quality and/or fitness for use?

Teagasc completed a detailed final report on this project which is available for download from the 'Soils and Subsoils' section of our Get Data download page.

How up to date is it?

The project was completed in 2014.

Where can I get this data?

You can view the data using our WebGIS EPA Maps, under the 'Land' group.

You can download the data from the EPA Database option of the Get Data page. Documents and GIS data are available under the 'Soils and Subsoils' section.

Please visit the Irish Soil Information System pages of Teagasc to view their WebGIS, download data, access reports and find out more about this soil product.



Soil and Subsoil

What does this data show me?

The national soils and subsoils maps were created by Teagasc in 2006, under a project funded by the EPA and DECLG, with input from the Geological Survey of Ireland.

The subsoils map classifies Ireland’s subsoils into 16 themes and the soils map classifies soils into 25 classes, both at a scale equivalent to 1:50,000.

What is the data quality and/or fitness for use?

Teagasc completed a detail final report on this project which is available to download from the soils and subsoils section of our data download page

How up to date is it?

The project was completed in 2006: the main differences therefore can be expected to be related to new construction where existing soils/subsoils are sealed over (this would place them in the “made land” soil class).

Please note: The Soils data will be displayed on EPA Maps until April 2017. It shall remain available to download from the Get Data page.

Where can I get this data?

You can view the data using our WebGIS on the Map link, under the Land group.

You can download the data from the EPA Database option of the Get data page. Documents and shapefiles are available under Soils and Subsoils option. Shapefiles are presented county by county for quick download but we can send a national file to you if you request this using the Contact Us link.

This data is not being updated but data errors can be reported via Contact Us for resolution.

EPA Licenced Facilities

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What does this data show me?

The EPA has a licensing and permitting function to control potentially harmful emissions to the environment. More information about licensing and permitting is available here.

Shapefiles of point locations of EPA licensed Integrated Pollution Control (IPC), Industrial Emissions (IE), Waste and Urban Waste Water treatment facilities can be downloaded from the Get data page.

The shapefiles include the name, easting, northing and EPA registration code of each facility. The registration code can be used to search for the facility on the EPA license search to see the most recent activity and license status for this site.

For IPC/IE and waste the address and principal activity codes are supplied. The principal activity codes relate to the EPA license search. For waste, the facility type is also included (e.g. landfill, transfer station etc.)

For urban waste water, a spreadsheet of the compliance of the agglomeration or plant as per the most recent Urban Waste Water Treatment report is supplied.

What is the data quality and/or fitness for use?

Use this data to track where an EPA licensed facility exists now or may have been in operation in the past.

Data Completeness: The data is considered to be >95% complete, if a license application has been received the facility is mapped within 2 months of that application being received.

Data Precision: The locations are supplied by licensees in the first instance, but are validated by the EPA GIS team using one or all of the following sources: An Post GeoDirectory, OSI orthoimgery, OSI Large Scale maps, EPA Inspector approval.

Data Accuracy: All facilities are given a license registration code which uniquely identifies them within the EPA licensing and enforcement databases and the license search on www.epa.ie.

While facility type, names and addresses are supplied they have been supplied by the licensee and may also change over time: the EPA License search represents the best source for this data and should be considered the most up to date.

Data Consistency: All facilities are represented as points and the An Post Geodirectory is the primary source of validation of this location.

How up to date is it?

The point locations are digitised when a licence application is received and this varies depending on the new licence applications presented at any particular time. The data on the download site is updated quarterly but the date of the update is included with the name of the file on the download site for clarity. Compliance results for urban waste water treatment are updated annually.

Where can I get this data?

You can view the data using our WebGIS on the Map link, under the Licenses and Enforcement group and UWWT group.

You can download the data from the EPA Database option of the Get data page. The national shapefiles are available under the EPA Licensed Facilities option.

This data is updated every quarter. Check the “notify me for updates” option when you download this data to receive an email when the new data is available.

Water Data

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As part of work done for the implementation of the Water Framework Directive, Ireland’s waters have been mapped in GIS format. This data is freely available to download: in full for OSI vector data license holders and as a generalised less detailed set for those who don’t hold the OSI license.

INSPIRE metadata files have been created for all this data which can be used with this user information to help get the most from this valuable data resource.

Rivers

What does this data show me?

Mapping of Ireland’s rivers in GIS format was started in 2002 using the Ordnance Survey of Ireland Discovery Series water lines as the starting point. These lines were joined together to create complete river stretches and each stretch was given a name either from the Discovery Series map or from the EPA river monitoring program.

Three key datasets make up the Rivers data package:

  1. A geometric river network, which can be used with network analysis tools such as ESRI’s utility network analyst, to trace upstream and downstream. The river network is stored as an ArcGIS 10.1 file geodatabase where it is presented via hydrometric area. In early 2016 this data was made available under Creative Commons Attribution license 4.0 by agreement with the OSI.
  2. A river routes shapefile of Ireland’s rivers at a scale of 1:50,000 showing rivers as complete lines attributed with name and Strahler river order. This lines shapefile is built from the river network areas. In early 2016 this data was made available under Creative Commons Attribution license 4.0 by agreement with the OSI.
  3. Water Framework Directive (WFD) river water bodies, which are the management and reporting units for the WFD. River stretches are grouped together based on common quality status and physical characteristics to form units. This data is formed from the river routes shapefile. The first river water bodies file created in 2004 is being revised and updated and will be released in 2014.

If this data is not what you are looking for, or you require larger scale data, you should contact the Ordnance Survey of Ireland.

What is the data quality and/or fitness for purpose?

This data is mapped at a scale of 1:50,000 and is considered fit for purpose at this scale. Network analysis of the river network will provide accurate results at this scale but will not represent smaller streams and drains visible at larger scales and so should not be used for very detailed studies of smaller catchment areas.

Data Completeness: The data is considered to be >95% complete at a scale of 1:50,000: if a river is visible at this scale it is appears in the EPA rivers files. At larger scales the data is less complete: while some small streams and drains are included this is done where they occur on the EPA river monitoring programme or have been identified as significant for other reasons (e.g. licensed emissions, changing the flow direction of rivers etc.). No formal survey of small streams and drains has been undertaken so the data should be considered fit for purpose at 1:50,000.

Data Precision: The data was gathered from the OSI Discovery series vector data product (1:50,000 scale). This data was gathered pre-2000, some small lakes have been added using either OSI orthoimagery (2005) or OSI large scale maps as a source. Lakes have been checked against rivers data to ensure that all lakes are properly connected to the river network where they occur along it.

Data Accuracy: Lake areas are calculated in ArcGIS. Lake segment codes are unique. 37% of the records have been attributed with a name, approximately 35% or more is taken directly from the OSI Discovery series but the remaining names were taken from local features such as townlands or larger rivers downstream and so represent a logically assigned name rather than the name that may be used locally.

Data Consistency: All lakes are represented as polygons, all lakes in the lake water bodies shape file are validated by EPA Scientists as being freshwater lakes rather than estuarine water (this has not been done for the complete lake segment file).

How up to date is it?

The data was generated from the OSI Discovery Series source, dated 2000. A low number of small lakes have been added since then from more recent sources (OSI 2005 images and/or field observations by EPA scientists).

Where can I get this data?

You can view the data using our WebGIS on the Map link, under the Water Features group and WFD Status 2007 – 2009 group.

Request this data via the Contact Us page:

  • If you have an OSI license, please supply us with the license number and we’ll send you the full national shapefile.
  • If you don’t have an OSI license use Contact Us to request the generalised version.

Lakes

Mapping of Ireland’s lakes in GIS format was started in 2002 using the Ordnance Survey of Ireland Discovery Series water polygons as the starting point. Polygons were closed and each polygon was given a name either from the Discovery Series map or from the EPA river monitoring program: 37% of the records have a name.

What does this data show me?

Two datasets make up the lakes data package:

  1. Lake segments: a file of polygons showing lakes that appear on the 1:50,000 Discovery Series map, with some smaller lakes included where they have been identified as significant (e.g. drinking water abstraction, protected site etc.). This shapefile has <12,000 records. In early 2016 this data was made available under Creative Commons Attribution license 4.0 by agreement with the OSI.
  2. Water Framework Directive (WFD) lake water bodies, which are the management and reporting units for the WFD. About 800 lakes are identified as WFD lakes either due to their size or their significance as a habitat, drinking water source, use as recreational water or other reason. This data is available to all users.

If this data is not what you are looking for, or you require larger scale data, you should contact the Ordnance Survey of Ireland.

What is the data quality and/or fitness for purpose?

This data is mapped at a scale of 1:50,000 and is considered fit for purpose at this scale: it should not be used for very detailed studies of smaller catchment areas.

Data Completeness: The data is considered to be >98% complete at a scale of 1:50,000: if a lake is visible at this scale it is appears in the EPA lake segments file. At larger scales the data is less complete: while some small lakes are included this is done where they occur on the EPA lake monitoring programme or have been identified as significant for other reasons. Some but not all turloughs appear so the data is not complete for these types of lake. No formal survey of small lakes has been undertaken so the data should be considered fit for purpose at 1:50,000.

Data Precision: The data was gathered from the OSI Discovery series vector data product (1:50,000 scale). This data was gathered pre-2000, some small lakes have been added using either OSI orthoimagery (2005) or OSI large scale maps as a source. Lakes have been checked against rivers data to ensure that all lakes are properly connected to the river network where they occur along it.

Data Accuracy: Lake areas are calculated in ArcGIS. Lake segment codes are unique. 37% of the records have been attributed with a name, approximately 35% or more is taken directly from the OSI Discovery series but the remaining names were taken from local features such as townlands or larger rivers downstream and so represent a logically assigned name rather than the name that may be used locally.

Data Consistency: All lakes are represented as polygons, all lakes in the lake water bodies shape file are validated by EPA Scientists as being freshwater lakes rather than estuarine water (this has not been done for the complete lake segment file).

How up to date is it?

The data was generated from the OSI Discovery Series source, dated 2000. A low number of small lakes have been added since then from more recent sources (OSI 2005 images and/or field observations by EPA scientists).

Where can I get this data?

You can view the data using our WebGIS on the Map link, under the Water Features group and WFD Status 2007 – 2009 group.

Request this data via the Contact Us page:

  • If you have an OSI license, please supply us with the license number and we’ll send you the full national shapefile.
  • If you don’t have an OSI license use Contact Us to request the generalised version.

Groundwater

Mapping of Ireland’s groundwater in GIS format was completed in 2004 after collaboration between the Geological Survey of Ireland and the groundwater team of the EPA. The starting point was an aquifer map of Ireland which showed the hydraulic boundaries of flow.

What does this data show me?

Groundwater bodies are determined from this starting point: an aquifer must be classed as a waterbody if it is capable of serving 10m3/day of abstraction or if significant abstraction from the aquifer would damage a related terrestrial or surface water ecosystem (either by the impact of removing the water directly or by the changes in the chemical status of the water brought about by the abstraction).

What is the data quality and/or fitness for purpose?

This data is a representation of water bodies designated for the Water Framework Directive and it is intended to be used within this remit.

Data Completeness: The data is considered to be >95% complete: if a groundwater body is capable of serving 10m3/day of abstraction, or has other significance, it is designated as a groundwater body.

Data Accuracy and Precision: Aquifer mapping and classification was based on Geological Survey of Ireland source data. See http://www.gsi.ie/Programmes/Groundwater/Aquifer+Classification.htm to access details of how aquifers were classified.

Data Consistency: All groundwater bodies are represented as polygons, all groundwater bodies in the shapefile are validated by scientists in the Geological Survey or Ireland and the EPA Scientists as meeting the criteria for a Water Framework Directive groundwater body.

How up to date is it?

The data was generated from GSI geology source material in 2004. An update is currently underway and should be available during 2014.

Where can I get this data?

You can view the data using our WebGIS on the Map link, under the Water Features group and WFD Status 2007 – 2009 group.

You can download the data from the EPA Database option of the Get data page. The national shapefiles are available under the Water option.


Transitional and Coastal

Transitional waters are bodies of water near the coast that are partially saline but still strongly influenced by freshwater flow. Coastal water bodies commence at the high water mark or at the boundaries of transitional water bodies and extend 1 nautical mile out to sea.

What does this data show me?

Transitional and coastal water body polygons fit with the lakes and rivers GIS layers to give a complete national picture of water from river sources through lakes and right out off the coast. The transitional and coastal water polygon shapefiles show the areas of water that EPA Scientists have assessed to have hydrological and ecological characteristics that make them discrete areas of water.

What is the data quality and/or fitness for purpose?

This data is a representation of water bodies designated for the Water Framework Directive and it is intended to be used within this remit.

Data Completeness: Coastal water bodies extend out to the 1 nautical mile limit from either the high water mark or the transitional water boundary and so represent complete coverage of the assigned coastal water area. Transitional water body boundaries extend from either tidal limits of rivers or high water marks but in some cases the exact boundary between the river and the transitional water has been assigned based on expert opinion and may be revised as a result of field studies.

Data Precision: The high water mark was generated from OSI six inch mapping. Outward boundaries of 1 nautical mile are generated from this line. Internal water body boundaries were delineated based on the assessment of EPA Scientists following WFD guidance material prepared at European level on the delineation of water bodies.

Data Accuracy: Names and codes are unique and all water bodies have been assigned these attributes. Type and salinity attributes were assigned by EPA Scientists on the basis of field surveys and scientific models.

Data Consistency: All water bodies are represented as polygons, transitional and coastal water bodies share boundaries and do not intersect. All names and codes are unique across both datasets so that they can be used as a single data resource.

How up to date is it?

The data was generated from OSI source material in 2004. The boundaries were last reviewed and updated in 2012.

Where can I get this data?

You can view the data using our WebGIS on the Map link, under the Water Features group and WFD Status 2007 – 2009 group.

You can download the data from the EPA Database option of the Get data page. The national shapefiles are available under the Water option.

This data doesn’t have a regular update schedule, but may be amended from time to time. Check the “notify me for updates” option when you download this data to receive an email when the new data is available.

Water Quality and Monitoring

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What does this data show me?

Ecological assessments of rivers are rated using the EPA Q Value system. This is a five point system ranging from Bad through Poor, Moderate, Good to High quality. These assessments have been ongoing since 1971. The river station locations are presented as shapefiles and the QValue scores are presented as a Microsoft Excel table which can be linked to the stations shapefile via the station number.

For more information on river quality monitoring please see our Ireland's environment water pages.

What is the data quality and/or fitness for purpose?

The stations and data are intended to show the changes in ecological river quality over time, as assessed by EPA Scientists from field observations.

Data Completeness: The data is considered to be >99% complete: if a river station had a valid Q Value assessment completed since 1971 it is included in the station file and the results file.

Data Precision: Station points are located at bridges, with the OSI Discovery Series 1:50,000 maps used as the source. The station is generally positioned in the centre of the bridge as shown on the map, the actual sample access point may be either side of the bridge. In 2010 a data quality project was run to capture all station locations accurately: where the co-ordinates did not map on a river the station location information was used to place the station at the correct location. Station numbers get larger downstream so station locations occur in the correct order upstream and downstream but for stations that have not been visited in a long time this location may not always be the exact point where the sample was taken.

Data Accuracy: All stations are snapped to a river line via the river routes shapefile. Station numbers are all unique. Station location information is generally entered by field scientists relative to the location as shown on the OSI Discovery Series 1:50,000 map but for older stations it may refer to features shown on larger scale maps.

Data Consistency: All stations are represented as points, all station locations are unique and station points were checked in 2010 to ensure that 2 differently coded stations do not appear in the same location.

How up to date is it?

River ecological surveys commenced in 1971. The field survey season runs from May to October annually. Ecological assessment data is validated during this season and then after the end of the fieldwork season. Data validated in the ecological assessment database is updated on the EPA Maps WebGIS overnight and so visible the next day.

Where can I get this data?

You can view the data using our WebGIS on the Map link, under the Surface Water Quality group.

You can download the data from the EPA Database option of the Get data page. The national shapefile and resultS table are available under the Water Quality and Monitoring option.

This data is updated every year. Check the “notify me for updates” option when you download this data to receive an email when the new data is available.

Mines

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In 2009 the EPA and Geological Survey of Ireland completed a study of Ireland’s historic mine sites. Each site was studied in detail to provide a risk assessment: the locations, boundaries and features identified in the mine site were mapped and captured as a set of shapefiles.

What does this data show me?

The shapefiles show mine boundaries, locations (centroids of the boundaries), features such as buildings, chimneys etc., chemical analysis locations and results, water features such as sinkholes and drains, waste features such as discharges, drains and waste heaps for the 28 mine districts studied.

What is the data quality and/or fitness for purpose?

This data was collected as part of a study to assess the risk of historic mines to human health. The shapefiles are intended as a resource for any remediation works that are planned for these sites.

Data Completeness: The data is considered to be >99% complete for the 28 districts studied. If a feature was present on the site, within the boundary of the mine, it was mapped as part of the study.

Data Precision: Features were mapped as a result of field study using OSI data to assist in mapping them as shapefiles.

Data Accuracy: Features were captured and classified by Geological Survey of Ireland field staff.

Data Consistency: Features are presented in the appropriate geometry type (boundaries as polygons, linear features such as drains as polylines and structures such as chimneys and adits as points). The shapefiles are logically grouped according to the features mapped.

How up to date is it?

The project was completed in 2009 and represents features found on site before that date.

Where can I get this data?

You can view the data using our WebGIS on the Map link, under the Mines group.

You can download the data from the EPA Database option of the Get data page. The shapefiles are available under the Mines option.

This data is not being updated but data errors can be reported via Contact Us for resolution.